Pretty Picture
A symbol of Christ’s atonement for sin and of the Church
Simple yet formal and elegant panels are basically monochromatic, giving the opportunity to examine the quality of stained glass
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Under the choir loft and flanking either side of the door, we can appreciate four panels of wood-framed glass that separate the nave and vestibule.

These simple yet formal and elegant panels are basically monochromatic, giving the opportunity to examine the quality of stained glass: the ripples, veining bubbles and flecking—irregularities which add character and beauty to the glass.

The panels feature circular medallions, each enclosing a symbolic device. Perhaps the most unfamiliar is the Pious Pelican feeding its young with its blood.

The ancient Romans believed the pelican, if it could not find food for its young, would pierce its breast with its beak and so nourish them on its own blood. The pelican has thus become for Christians a symbol of Christ’s atonement for sin and of the Church, which nourishes its children with the Blood of Christ.

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